I still feel—well—not very good at this. It still feels like something the boss had his nephew, the one who’s “good with computers,” cobble together. I still feel like it’s missing whatever je ne sais quoi separates passable design from really solidly good design. The header is a problem generally, the tagline needs to be rethought, or rather thought at all, the search button and its hidden bar need to be styled differently. Have to do something with the text over the kittens. Also the requirements changed and the client threw out my original pitch in favor of going with something solidly modern, so I’m scrambling for ways to make “clean” feel distinctive.
(The fixed sidebars got cut off in the scrolling screenshot; they’re normally fine.)
And yet and all the same. And yet and all the same it’s a start, maybe even a solid start, and I have seven-and-a-half months to figure out how to get it closer to right, and I’m getting better at this stuff fast, and maybe this won’t come out so disastrously. Heaven knows the bar is pretty low, or at least the exogenous one is, and we can leave the crazy endogenous ones be for now. I mean, two months ago I couldn’t figure out how to put a Web page together without Bootstrap, you know?
I guess what I’m saying is, this is something I’m doing, and I’m very ashroud1 of it.


Proshamed?↩

I still feel—well—not very good at this. It still feels like something the boss had his nephew, the one who’s “good with computers,” cobble together. I still feel like it’s missing whatever je ne sais quoi separates passable design from really solidly good design. The header is a problem generally, the tagline needs to be rethought, or rather thought at all, the search button and its hidden bar need to be styled differently. Have to do something with the text over the kittens. Also the requirements changed and the client threw out my original pitch in favor of going with something solidly modern, so I’m scrambling for ways to make “clean” feel distinctive.

(The fixed sidebars got cut off in the scrolling screenshot; they’re normally fine.)

And yet and all the same. And yet and all the same it’s a start, maybe even a solid start, and I have seven-and-a-half months to figure out how to get it closer to right, and I’m getting better at this stuff fast, and maybe this won’t come out so disastrously. Heaven knows the bar is pretty low, or at least the exogenous one is, and we can leave the crazy endogenous ones be for now. I mean, two months ago I couldn’t figure out how to put a Web page together without Bootstrap, you know?

I guess what I’m saying is, this is something I’m doing, and I’m very ashroud1 of it.


  1. Proshamed?

oupacademic:


Did you know that each American adult consumes an average of 33 pounds of cheese each year?

With more than 2,000 varieties of cheese available today, it is one of the world’s most celebrated foods. Michael Tunick’s The Science of Cheese takes us on an entertaining journey through the history of cheese and cheese-making.

Relevant to certain of your interests, cough cough lindstifa.

oupacademic:

Did you know that each American adult consumes an average of 33 pounds of cheese each year?

With more than 2,000 varieties of cheese available today, it is one of the world’s most celebrated foods. Michael Tunick’s The Science of Cheese takes us on an entertaining journey through the history of cheese and cheese-making.

Relevant to certain of your interests, cough cough lindstifa.

Swerve me? The path to my fixed purpose is laid with iron rails, whereon my soul is grooved to run. Over unsounded gorges, through the rifled hearts of mountains, under torrents’ beds, unerringly I rush! Naught’s an obstacle, naught’s an angle to the iron way!

– Captain Ahab, Herman Melville’s Moby-Dick

How did you go from hardcore man about words to hardcore man about web-based software development SEO SQL JS DUI?

swamibooba

I’ve been thinking about this myself a fair amount lately, so I apologize if I maunder on a bit. The “TL;DR” version of the story is that I bought a copy of Sublime Text ages ago to use as a LaTeX editor (I picked up LaTeX during my ur-nerd phase, roundabouts high school, and never looked back—WYSIWIG editors make me wince and moan and whine, now and forevermore) and became frustrated that there were certain things it wouldn’t do, so I learned Python to get access to its API and make it do them. After a while, I’d built up a weirdly active GitHub profile full of these weird little projects, and a local startup happened to come across it while looking for an extra pair of hands.

But I’ve been thinking about whether or not getting back into programming constitutes some kind of out-selling w/r/t my writerly ambitions. It’s certainly easy to look at it that way, but I’m not totally convinced. For one thing, I’m still writing—not as much, sure, but I’m still doing it. I even finished the Westboro project, albeit to little fanfare and less acclaim. And I’m still reading. And I’ll be back in school eventually, I imagine. So there’s the fact that they’re not mutually exclusive to consider.

Even with that aside, though: I’m feeling a little… guilty? About having spent so much time willfully ignoring this area of my brain and mind and capacity. I had this skill, or this potential skill, that I’d really spent years cultivating, till one day, like a spoiled child, I decided I was bored with it and stuffed it in a drawer. Effectively squandering not just a lucrative and practically useful base of knowledge but a part of my personal self.

In large part, the justification has to do with where I suspect the limits to my talent in this domain lie—that is to say, with the fact that I don’t think I’ll ever be a “great” developer, whereas I do have ambitions towards something approaching literary greatness. (Itself a shameful obsession-confession, but there it is.) Which is maybe more legitimate, and less mercenary, than it sounds, because it’s not just a question of laurels and accolades but also a question of where I can make the most significant contribution—not just a question of being valued but of being valuable.

It’s true that those limits are falling away so quickly now that I’m devoting serious work to exercising this long-neglected muscle that it’s hard to say where I’ll plateau, but I’m much more certain that I will. Somewhere. And the prospect of devoting the whole of my life to something I’m just not that good at is like can’t-even-look-at-it-straight nightmarish.

I made a sideways move from art history into writing, and I think this, in part, is why I also find the stern distinction between fiction and nonfiction odd. It’s not at all a natural way of splitting up narrated experience, just as we don’t go around the museum looking for fictional or nonfictional paintings. Painters know that everything is a combination of what’s observed, what’s imagined, what’s overheard, and what’s been done before. Is Monet a nonfiction painter and Ingres a fiction painter? It’s the least illuminating thing we could ask about their works. Some lean more heavily on what’s seen, some more on what’s imagined, but all draw on various sources.

Aleksandr Hemon interviews Teju Cole for BOMB magazine (via jarrettfuller)
monkeyfrog:

mikerastiello:

Prickly heart on Flickr.

GPOY

monkeyfrog:

mikerastiello:

Prickly heart on Flickr.

GPOY